iOS 5.0.1 and over the air software updates

The latest software update (5.0.1) of iOS brings with it the first experience of the iOS 5 over the air software updates. And I can say that I am a big fan !

My previously blogged about methods for updating multiple iPhones in a household are no longer necessary. The 5.0.1 over the air software update was a manageable 44MB and very kind on my bandwidth (even when downloading it more than once to upgrade each phone over our household wireless).

iOS 5.0.1 Release Notes

  • Fixes bugs affecting battery life
  • Adds Multitasking Gestures for original iPad
  • Resolves bugs with Documents in the Cloud
  • Improves voice recognition for Australian users using dictation
Advertisements

Download iOS 5.0 for updating multiple iPhone 4 devices

When there are multiple iPhones in a household and you want to upgrade them all from a single iOS download via multiple Macs, it can be a bit of a challenge. I have previously blogged about how to do this. This post contains the link to the new major version (5.0) of iOS for the iPhone 4 which contains over 200 new features.

Download URL

The iOS 5.0 firmware update file (.ipsw) is available at:

Update

Updating each iPhone as per my previous post resulted in a strange 3002 error.

I finally managed to solve this by placing the downloaded .ipsw file in the following location on each Mac:

  • /Library/iTunes/iPhone Software Updates

Create the folder if it does not exist. Clicking on the update button in the iPhone Summary page in iTunes will update your iPhone. Repeat with each Mac and iPhone combination.

Download iOS 4.3.5 for updating multiple iPhone 4 devices

When there are multiple iPhones in a household and you want to upgrade them all from a single iOS download via multiple Macs, it can be a bit of a challenge. I have previously blogged about how to do this. This post contains the link to the latest version (4.3.5) of iOS for the iPhone 4 which deals with a certificate validation security vulnerability.

iOS 4.3.5 Release Notes

Fixes a security vulnerability with certificate validation.

Download URL

The iOS 4.3.5 firmware update file (.ipsw) is available at:

Update

Update each iPhone as per my previous post.

Download iOS 4.3.3 for updating multiple iPhone 4 devices

When there are multiple iPhones in a household and you want to upgrade them all from a single iOS download via multiple Macs, it can be a bit of a challenge. I have previously blogged about how to do this. This post contains the link to the latest version (4.3.3) of iOS for the iPhone 4 which aims to placate location data concerns.

iOS 4.3.3 Release Notes

This update contains changes to the iOS crowd-sourced location database cache including:

  • Reduces the size of the cache
  • No longer backs the cache up to iTunes
  • Deletes the cache entirely when Location Services is turned off

Download URL

The iOS 4.3.3 firmware update file (.ipsw) is available at:

Update

Update each iPhone as per my previous post.

Upgrading a MacBook (13” Aluminum, Late 2008) – Part 2 (HDD)

I love my MacBook. It was the first 13” aluminum unibody notebook from Apple and although it was launched as part of the MacBook range it has since migrated to the MacBook Pro range.

I run my MacBook through a 24” Samsung SyncMaster T240 and use the wired keyboard and wired mouse. This gives me a nice desktop setup and when I need to be mobile the 13” form factor is perfect.

Lately I have begun to feel the limits of the stock 2GB RAM and the 160GB HDD. So it is time for an upgrade. This post marks the completion of a 2 part project to upgrade both the RAM and the HDD of my MacBook.

No Space

Right clicking on Macintosh HD > Get Info showed that I had around 5GB of HDD space left on my MacBook. I bought the replacement drive for this little project over a year ago but had been putting off replacing my HDD – it was finally time …

Macintosh HD Info

HDD Specifications

I read a number of reviews and posts on various forums and blogs about what an ideal replacement drive would be. I looked at the prices between 320GB and 500GB HDDs (remember this is over a year ago) and finally settled on finding a HDD with a capacity of 500GB. My logic was that the bigger the drive was, the less likely I would have to do this again during my MacBook’s lifetime.

The next challenge was whether to get a 5400RPM or 7200RPM drive. Again there was heated debate in the forums and on blogs. The two contenders for me were:

I liked the fact that the drive in my MacBook was so quiet and wanted to maintain that experience. Western Digital advertised WhisperDrive technology on their Scorpio Blue drives which was meant to yield the quietest 2.5 inch drives on the market. This claim seemed to be held up in the forums and since I was not doing anything seriously IO intensive on the MacBook I decided to go with the 5400RPM Western Digital Scorpio Blue 500GB. I also ensured that the drive was no higher than 9.5mm due to ongoing debates on various forums.

Cloning the HDD

This is the part of the process that kept me from upgrading months ago. The contents of the existing HDD in the MacBook would have to be cloned to the new HDD. I had read a number of blog posts on using the SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner utilities and it all seemed simple enough – but I was still a little nervous. I finally settled on using Disk Utility which is bundled with Mac OS X and is all you really need for cloning your HDD. A simple and easy to understand post by Daryn Cox got me started.

I mounted my new 500GB HDD into an external USB enclosure. I fired up Disk Utility via Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility and selected the Restore tab. I dragged the icon of the existing Macintosh HD from the left pane into the Source box and the icon of the new external 500GB HDD from the left pane into the Destination box. Ensure that the Erase destination checkbox is checked. Double check that your existing HDD is the source and that the new HDD is the destination before proceeding.

Disk Utility > Restore

Click the Restore button.

Confirm Erase of Destination

Confirm the erasure of the destination drive by clicking on the Erase button.

Cloning ...

Then wait… My estimated time fluctuated between 3 and 6 hours initially but I left it running overnight so I’m not really sure how long it actually took. It is probably better if you don’t use your MacBook while this operation is taking place.

Verify Clone

Once the cloning process has completed you need to verify that the clone was successful. The easiest way to do this is to boot from your new HDD. There are two ways to do this in Mac OS X:

Option1: System Preferences > Startup Disk

Navigate to the Startup Disk section of System Preferences. Select the new external 500GB and click the Restart button.

Startup Disk

Confirm the restart by clicking on the Restart button.

Startup Disk - Restart

Option 2: Option Key at System Boot

Hold down the option key during system boot.

Mac - Option Key

Startup Disks

Select the new external 500GB.

Once I had confirmed that my drive had been correctly cloned, it was time to install the new HDD into the MacBook.

Installing the new HDD

Apple provide fairly detailed instructions via their support site on how to upgrade your HDD. See Chapter 3: Boost Your MacBook > Replacing the Hard Disk Drive of the manual for the MacBook 13" Aluminum (Late 2008). I had my cloned HDD, some decent precision screwdrivers this time around and was ready to begin.

Ready to begin

Opening up the MacBook

Turn the MacBook over and push down on the door latch to release the access door. Remove the access door and the battery. The battery has a handy tab on it to make lifting it out of the bay easier.

Remove access door and battery

Make sure to ground yourself before touching anything inside your MacBook.

Ground yourself

Removing the old HDD

The old HDD should be visible on the bottom left of the MacBook.

Old HDD

Remove the bracket holding the old HDD using a #00 Philips precision screwdriver. I finally found a decent #00 Philips and the experience removing my HDD was much better than when I upgraded my RAM… If the only advice you take away from this is to find a really decent precision screwdriver then you will be halfway there.

Lift the old HDD out of the bay using the clear tab and then gently wiggle the connector off the HDD. Remove the mounting screws using a Torx T6 precision screwdriver. Again I will say it – spend the cash and get a decent screwdriver.

Remove old HDD

Old HDD removed

Installing the new HDD

Remove the clear tab from the old HDD and attach to the new HDD. Screw the mounting screws into the new HDD using the Torx T6 screwdriver.

New HDD

Place the new HDD into the drive bay.

New HDD in drive bay

Replace the bracket using the #00 Philips screwdriver.

Replace bracket

Replace bracket

Closing up the MacBook

Place the battery back into the bay and then replace the access door. Press it down gently until the latch moves to the closed position.

Confirmation

Switch on the MacBook and make sure it boots. Right clicking on Macintosh HD > Get Info now shows my new 500GB HDD and plenty of free space.

Macintosh HD Info

Download iOS 4.3.2 for updating multiple iPhone 4 devices

When there are multiple iPhones in a household and you want to upgrade them all from a single iOS download via multiple Macs, it can be a bit of a challenge. I have previously blogged about how to do this. This post contains the link to the latest version of iOS for the iPhone 4.

Using a proxy

I again used Charles to capture the url of the iOS 4.3.2 firmware update file (.ipsw). I had to enable the SOCKS proxy options this time to capture the traffic successfully.

Enable the SOCKS proxy in Charles by clicking on Proxy > Proxy Settings in the menu and checking the Enable SOCKS proxy checkbox in the Proxies tab.

Enable SOCKS proxy

Also check the Use SOCKS proxy in the Mac OS X tab.

Enable SOCKS proxy

Download URL

The iOS 4.3.2 firmware update file (.ipsw) that iTunes was downloading is clearly visible in Charles:

iOS download in Charles

Update

Update each iPhone as per my previous post.

Updating multiple iPhones with a single iOS 4.2 download

After a number of years of roughly 200MB upgrades for my iPhone 3G and then iPhone 4 I was shocked when the latest iOS 4.2 update weighed in at just over 600MB. Added to the gut punch was the fact that I had to upgrade 2 iPhones now – yes, my wife has joined the cult.

What is iTunes actually downloading ?

iTunes makes it really easy to upgrade your iPhone but I wanted to be able to download the update once and use it to upgrade both phones.

01 - New version available

iTunes hides all the details from you – so how was I going to get at the iOS 4.2 firmware update file (.ipsw) ?

Use the proxy luke !

An HTTP proxy is a tool every developer should know how to use. I use Charles on Mac OS X. Fire up Charles to force all the HTTP traffic through a proxy and then click on the Update button in iTunes to start the download.

02 - iTunes

The other major factor in downloading this update only once is clearly visible in the status column. My ADSL router was on its way out and I just couldn’t get decent download speeds at the time. Thank goodness those days of darkness are behind me now – I’m very happy with my new LinkSys Dual-Band Wireless-N ADSL2+ Modem Gigabit Router. But I digress …

03 - Charles HTTP Proxy

The iOS 4.2 firmware update file (.ipsw) that iTunes was downloading is clearly visible in Charles:

We now have the complete URL for the file and can download it outside of iTunes. Stop the iTunes download as its purpose had now been served.

Download

I use curl when downloading large files and since it is bundled in Mac OS X there is no extra download or installation required.

04 - Curl download file

The "-C –" switch combination tells curl to automatically calculate where to resume the transfer. This ensures that if the connection drops or is reset you can resume the download where you left off.

The "-O" switch tells curl to save the download to a local file with the same name as the remote file.

Install

Fire up iTunes and hold down the option key while clicking on the Update button.

 01 - New version available

05 - Option update

The file selection dialog will open. Select the iOS 4.2 firmware update file (.ipsw) you have just downloaded.

06 - Select file

All the next steps will be familiar since they are all part of the standard steps for iOS updates.

07 - Update

Confirm that your iPhone has been updated.

08 - Updated

Now repeat the Install steps for each of your iPhones that you want to update.